Download Issues of U&lc!

This. Is. Awesome. Past issues of U&lc are now available for download. If you remember from our Typestory lecture in the beginning of the semester, ITC first published U&lc in 1974. Under the editorial and art direction of Herb Lubalin over the course of 26 years, U&lc grew in acclaim to become the most important typographic publication of its time. The last publication year of U&lc was 1999.

When I was in college, this publication influenced me tremendously. It opened my eyes to design and typography. Herb Lubalin is a master of typography and layout. I still find so much inspiration in these pages and I hope you do too.

Download Link:
http://fdcblog.net/2010/10/25/ulc-back-issues-to-be-made-available/


Just My Type: A Book About Fonts

From The New York Times:

DESIGN: The Look of Letters

Simon Garfield in “Just My Type: A Book About Fonts” looks at the geeky world of typography and how it pervades urban life.

Typographica.org

Typographica is a great source that I like using for typeface reviews, inspiration, commentary on typefaces and typographic design. Bookmark this site and check it out.

What do you think?

Periodic Table of Typefaces
While I was surfing on internet, I found something interesting that I want to share with class. It is a periodic table made out of typefaces, and I thought it is very helpful and related to the lecture that Irina gave to us!
Submitted by Heeseung Lee

Periodic Table of Typefaces

While I was surfing on internet, I found something interesting that I want to share with class. It is a periodic table made out of typefaces, and I thought it is very helpful and related to the lecture that Irina gave to us!

Submitted by Heeseung Lee

Be a Type Detective

Start Collecting

How do you correctly identify a typeface? Type specimens are the answer. The example above is a type specimen of Miller typeface, designed by Matthew Carter.

A type specimen allows you to see the whole character set, see the typeface in a range of sizes (especially the sizes you’re referencing), and see samples of the design in use. Comprehensive type specimens are easily found in the SVA library, online, and on your computer.

Here are some starting points:

Use your computer
The first thing you can do is use font management software on your computer. FontXplorer or FontBook programs are built into the Mac OS that allow you to view type specimens. If you don’t have these programs, or don’t have many loaded fonts, try going to the SVA DIC lab.

Go to the library
There are plenty of type reference guides/type specimen books/type catalogs in the SVA library, and all of the NY public libraries. Take pictures or make photocopies of the pages if you’re unable to check out the books.

Browse through online type foundries
Type foundries offer specimen books, catalogs, brochures and posters. Some materials are free (you might have to register on their website or send an email request), and many offer downloadable PDF specimens. You could try Font Bureau and MyFonts to start. The problem with online foundries is that they contain a lot of new, weird, ill-designed and crazy typefaces—lacking the traditional, classic type specimens that you’ll to need to identify. I suggest this option as a last resort. Be wary and use your trained typography eye!

Plan ahead and stay organized
Don’t wait until the last minute to start looking for type specimens. Collect specimen materials ahead of time, and keep comparing them to the examples you’re showing this week. You’ll find that type specimens are extremely useful. Once you’re in the habit of collecting specimens, keep them organized. This way you’ll be able to find the type you need, when you need it.